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Austin Henley

Austin Henley

Austin Henley

Assistant Professor


Contact Information

Austin Henley

  • Office Address: Min H. Kao Building, Room 353
  • Phone: 865-974-8966
  • Fax: 865-974-5483
  • E-mail: azh@utk.edu
Personal Website

Education

  • PhD, Computer Science, University of Memphis, 2018
  • MS, Computer Science, University of Memphis, 2013

Biography

Austin Henley

Austin Henley is an assistant professor in electrical engineering and computer science at UT. He received his bachelor’s degree in 2011 from Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, Tennessee, before attending the University of Memphis where he received his master’s in 2013 and Ph.D. in 2018, all in computer science.

Henley’s research focuses on the human aspects of software engineering. He conducts empirical studies to better understand the behavior of software developers, and then builds software tools to make developers more productive. In particular, his dissertation addressed problems developers face when navigating source code by extending code editors with more efficient affordances for navigation. He has applied his research to industrial settings during his five internships, which included Microsoft Research, National Instruments, and IBM Research. His current research interests include supporting collaborative software development as well as the learnability of software development tools.

Towards being an effective teacher, Henley took a number of graduate-level Educational Psychology courses. He was able to apply this knowledge when he taught as an Instructor for an undergraduate Operating Systems course in 2016. Moreover, he was the departmental Graduate Student Association President which gave him ample experience in mentoring fellow graduate students. Moving forward, he strives to apply findings from CS Education research to his teaching to better equip students in their careers.


Research

Austin Henley

  • Software engineering
  • Human-computer interaction
  • Developer productivity
Google Scholar